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I have watched some health conscious people on youtube who recommended that you do massage to work out the tension that you have built up over time. They said that this would help with athletic performance, and that it might take progressive sessions to work.

I have gone for a massage on occasion with my mother previously, just for a treat, but today I had a massage therapist who explained that it is the case that it takes several sessions to work out the built up tension in the muscles.

I am so glad that I went and got that massage. I feel so much more relaxed, and I think I am going to go back.

 

At any rate, these are my suggestions:

1. Tell the massage therapist what areas you would like them to work on and what areas you wouldn't like worked on before they start.

2. Focus on yourself. You can bring a friend, but don't plan anything super stressful for right after your massage, and be selfish with your time because it's all about you, for real, really and you should respect yourself enough to do that for yourself.

3. Go for the earliest appointment for better service.

4. Look for coupons, especially right before Christmas if you go right before Christmas, and at health fairs.

5.  When looking for a place to get a massage, ask if they have organic massage lotions.

6. Look at the massage packages, and divide them to standardize for how much one hour costs, to see which massages are cheapest.

 

What are your suggestions?

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Replies to This Discussion

And if you find a massage therapist you "click with," tip them well and schedule your next massage with him/her. Drink LOTS of water afterward to minimize muscle aches and pains the next morning from release of toxins, etc. (lactic acid  maybe?) And, yes, take your time to relax afterward to really enjoy it.

Every massage therapist I have been to has asked me what I would like worked on and what I don't want touched. I always bring my own virgin coconut oil. I call ahead to check on their scent free policies.

I went to the local school of massage and had an awesome massage so check out the schools.

I recently had a chair massage and I have to say it was one of the absolute best I have ever had.

Bring your own music or ask that they shut off the music playing. Heck why listen to something that is just going to aggravate you.

These are great ideas! Thank you for your thoughts... I think I've had some bad massage therapists in the past because they didn't really ask me what I wanted. Instead, the one I went to I told right up front before anything, but she seemed to be very attentive and listened to what I needed. I think this could really work for me, especially turning off the music.

Jean said:

Every massage therapist I have been to has asked me what I would like worked on and what I don't want touched. I always bring my own virgin coconut oil. I call ahead to check on their scent free policies.

I went to the local school of massage and had an awesome massage so check out the schools.

I recently had a chair massage and I have to say it was one of the absolute best I have ever had.

Bring your own music or ask that they shut off the music playing. Heck why listen to something that is just going to aggravate you.

It is really interesting to hear what a massage therapist says because you know so much about massage and I know next to nothing...


I have a question for you... I have a problem with pulling my eyebrows out (trichotillomania, I've had problems with it since like 7th grade). In addition to that at my relatively young age I'm getting fine lines which are heading towards wrinkles. I have some stuff that helps a lot with wrinkles (I think). I was wondering if a facial massage could help with any of that. I was actually thinking about acupunture for my eyebrows because the pressure in my face is just so strong there, but I haven't tried it and I'm not sure if that's the right thing for it.


Ida Friedman said:

As a massage therapist, I really appreciate feedback from a client. If I find out after a service (from the front desk staff) that the pressure was too hard/not hard enough or that the room was too hot/cold, etc. I can't fix it after the fact. If someone tells me during a service how I can make it to their liking, that ensures a great service. I do ask clients during a service to let me know these things, but for some reason they may say everything's fine, then I hear about it later. Same goes for facials.

I asked a client today what she wants from her facial.... (for example- is extraction the reason you came? Do you just want to zone out? Do you really wonder if the products you're using are appropriate for your skin type? Do you want to know if you can tone down redness or reduce hyperpigmentation?)

Her answer...."Oh, just a "normal" facial." 

P.S.- Turn your phone off or leave it in the locker if the spa provides one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hello everyone!  Massage is like raw food...it makes you healthier! I agree with all the comments. As a seasoned professional Master Esthetician and Lic. Massage therapist for over 28 yrs., these are my suggestions for the best massage therapy.

  • Don't eat a meal before or after  --- for one hour, and keep the meal light, such as a high water foods, melons, cucumbers, etc.
  • Drink purified water, with a higher pH of around 9.0, if possible, 8 oz. every hour until you retire for the day.
  • Have  2,000 mg. time releaseed good quality Vitamin C after your massage, as Vit. C helps with lactic acid buildup in the tissue and will help you not be as sore from deep tissue work.
  • When booking, ask what types and styles of massage the different therapists "specialize" in and find what will best suit the conditions you wish to addresss. Also ask how long they have been in the business if you have issues with joint pain, muscle spasms, etc.  
  • Arrive 15 minutes early to fill out forms and relax prior to your treatment.
  • If possible shower and dry brush your skin before your massage, OR, if in a spa, ask if this service can be added to your therapy.
  • If you have any allergies to plants, you can take your OWN massage oil. (or ask for a simple pure oil, not a massage cream)  I prefer a mix of 1/3rd ratio of each -  pure virgin coconut oil, cold pressed avacado oil, and jojoba oil. 
  • Most therapists have essenital oils and will create a blend for you according to your preference and needs.
  • Shaving just prior to services is NOT recommended. Shave the day prior, or at least 6 hours prior if needed.  The stimulation and oils used in the massage (and if a body "treatment" is done with salts or muds) can irritate freshly shaved skin.
  • If you're on medications, take them with you to share with your therapist.
  • If you take a daily vitamin, herbal supplements, take them with you to discuss with your therapist.
  • Eye contacts --- take solution and a case with you.  Half of your treatment will be with you laying face-down.  Your face will be in a face cradle, and may put pressure on your contacts. Also, if the therapist wishes to massage your face as part of the treatment, it is best to remover your contacts. 
  • Several hours after your massage, or prior to bed, if you have a trampoline re-bounder, it is excellent to gently re-bound for 5 to 10 minutes to move the lympahtic system, and help with any stagnet toxin build up, increase oxygen, and stimulate the elimination systems.  
  • Don't be surprised if you get a headache, or feel somewhat nausiated hours after a massage. This is normal, just increase your water intake, keep your body at an even temperature, and make sure to call the therapist to notify them. They may not want to work as long, or as deep for your next massage.
  • Women: if you are on your femanine cycle, please tell the therapist, as your skin, sense of touch, and smell will be heightened, and this will help your therapist to give you the best possible treatment.
  • Wear loose clothing or take them with you to leave in.
  • As you are on the massage table waiting for your therpist, take a few long slow breaths and mentally see your problems floating away as you exhale. This is a time for re-new-al . Allow yourself to feel the rhythm of each stroke, knowing that your body is being cared for and loved, by you  and the therapist.

 

Wow Ruth Ann, I am definitely going to try to follow your recommendations next time I get a massage! :-D

It doesn't sound healthy to add alcohol to your system prior to detoxifying your lymphatic system, especially when you need to hydrate so much... the alcohol would dehydrate you. 

You're right, I think it is that hollywood image that makes them think that they need to have drinks... There have been heavy ad campaigns to instill this belief in women particularly, and it has worked at an alarming rate on my generation.

I hope that people wouldn't leave thinking that they can't have a good massage without alcohol.


Ida Friedman said:

So many great points Ruth Ann brings up! If only more people approached massage with those intentions. At the spa where I work they serve wine and champagne. I try to explain that alcohol consumption is contraindicated before massage. They look at me like I'm nuts. So many people just know what they see on TV and in magazines. Ach!

I did get a chuckle out of this suggestion, though...

"If you're on medications take them with you to share with your therapist." HeeHee. I definitely don't want what they're having. Xanax, anyone? : )

I have never had a massage therapist ask me about any medication I was taking.

Most of them offer water after the massage.

 

Hmmm. No questionnaire? If a person is on blood thinners you can severely bruise them without intention, AND what is the medical condition for the thinners? This condition could also be very contraindicated if the person had a hot stone massage, or had rolling (with magnetic therapies) or dimpling therapies (wooden tools used for acupressure). I totally agree with IDA about clients passing out. It is wise to know you are going to someone (and establishment) that you have heard excellent reports on.

Wrinkles / Fine lines suggestion: Don't forget to use a good mineral based sun screen with a tested SPF 30 or higher...sun damage is accumulative over time. Ask around and see if anyone in your area has a proven micro-current treatment. Make sure to see before and after photos done with their equipment as all micro-current devices are NOT the same. (note: micro-current can also be used in body treatments for detox and cellulite. If they say they have a machine that uses ‘galvanic’ current it is NOT micro-current, and is not what you need for wrinkles and cellulite) True micro-current increases ATP in the skin (and body), encouraging collagen re-modeling. You can also take an internal supplement of Hyaluronic Acid as well as find an excellent topical Hyaluronic Serum, as it is a mega-water-binding agent excellent for dehydration for joints and skin. Best in health.


Jean said:

I have never had a massage therapist ask me about any medication I was taking.

Most of them offer water after the massage.

Great ideas...I love massages! ahhhhh

 

Thanks, I will try to look into this! :-)

Ida Friedman said:

Well, that's a few things there, but let's see... As far as the trichotillomania, I am not an expert, but I googled that and nutrition, and found an interesting study using NAC- the amino acid n-acetylcysteine. It was published July 2009 in the Archives of General Psychiatry( of all places!) I'm sure you can find that. As far as fine lines and wrinkles, I usually recommend omega-3's (fish oil or flax) drinking lots of water, eating lots of organic fruits and vegetables, and moisturizing. A great book is Kat James "The truth about beauty", I just love it.

There is an "Acupuncture facelift" that a friend of mine does. Much safer than surgery! I love acupuncture. Just like massage, facials, etc. - It's about finding someone you click with.Good luck!

I am recovering from a car accident from a week ago and part of my treatment is having an upper body massage 3x a week (15 minutes each). They have been painful but are producing positive results...only a tiny headache today...yea! So don't think of massage as only for spoiling yourself because they produce healing and health on many levels. I have learned to enjoy someone else taking care of me through massages and now see them as essential to my well being!

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