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To sprout my sunflower seeds, I soak for two days in a glass jar of room temp. water on a countertop, rinsing twice a day. Day two I rinse and drain and let them sit in the jar wet until long sprout tails form. By this time, they are ready...AND MOLDY! HELP. How can I get to the sprouted stage without mold? I've thrown my last two batches out entirely. I thought they wouldn't sprout if placed in a cold refrigerator.

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Maybe not enough air circulation in the glass mason jar? I do fill it two thirds high with seeds. Maybe I should transfer to a wide collander at the drained stage? I will try this.

I would place them in the fridge if their getting moldy outside on the counter.

 

I sprouted lentils without even trying and I left them in the fridge covered in distilled water never drained the water out and they sprouted within a few days. Go figure.

Some say drain water twice before the final soaking and they will sprout. Whatever works.

I use to have that problem.  However, I think the sunflower sprouts need to be put in a sprouter or colander after they have been soaked, so they can spread out.  My opinion is when they are put in a jar they are to close together and stay wet and then mold. Once they have sprouted with lOTS of white sprouts then I put them in a tray with a little dirt, and then spread a little dirt over them and water everyday.  Within a day they will start growing.  I am obsessed with these sprouts and have they everywhere, one growing, one sprouting and one soaking CONSTANTLY and I have not had any mold in months!  HOPE that helps.

T.W. Did you have better luck?  I started my third jar today. :)

 

Thanks Wanda!...I haven't tried again yet because I'd run out of sunnies, but I am picking some up today. I will post how it goes in a few:)

Try soaking the seeds for the first hour in a solution of water and bleach, using 1 teaspoon bleach to 1 quart of water,

then give them a good rinse. Often mold spores are present on the seed shell as well as in the air.

Soaked seeds should not over lap when spread out on the soil.

Do not put too many seeds on the soil.

When hulls begin to deteriorate they feed the mold. You'll need to tip the container

upside down and shake them out once roots have been established.

Try this ratio 4/10 ounce seed, per 2 1/2 cups soil in a deli container about 4 inches in diameter and 2 to 3 inches tall.

Also inverting a second container on top of the growing medium will give a terarium effect and keep the shells softer so

that the plants can open and shed them. Picking those shells off is a waste of time.

I would try disinfecting them with Nutribiotic made from grapefruit seed extract. I do give all mine a rinse with a few drops of that and spring water or filtered but I never had obvious mold problems with my sprout condo. It was only about $7 and has 4 levels.

Wow a little typing error here it should have read .4 to .5 ounce of seed to 3/4 cups of soil in a 4inch diameter deli contatiner about 3 inches tall. The concern is getting those shells away from the growing greens as the seed pods are feeding and harboring the mold. Once the roots have been established you can pull everything out of the growing container, invert it and give it a shake and the help get rid of the seed shells. This will allow watering from the bottom, by adding water to the container before plaicng the soil and greens back in the container. The greens develop quite a root system that bind the soil and roots together with in just a few days
 
Peter Steady and Amy Sobel said:

Try soaking the seeds for the first hour in a solution of water and bleach, using 1 teaspoon bleach to 1 quart of water,

then give them a good rinse. Often mold spores are present on the seed shell as well as in the air.

Soaked seeds should not over lap when spread out on the soil.

Do not put too many seeds on the soil.

When hulls begin to deteriorate they feed the mold. You'll need to tip the container

upside down and shake them out once roots have been established.

Try this ratio 4/10 ounce seed, per 2 1/2 cups soil in a deli container about 4 inches in diameter and 2 to 3 inches tall.

Also inverting a second container on top of the growing medium will give a terarium effect and keep the shells softer so

that the plants can open and shed them. Picking those shells off is a waste of time.

I use "easy sprouters" which has enabled me to grow sprouts I couldn't previously, like broccoli, alpha, clover, beets, lentils, fenugreek, wheat berries, and buckwheat.  They are the best.  They have two cups, one with holes for the seeds and the other collects water.  You raise the inner container and it allows air to circulate so the sprouts don't mold or stop growing.  There is a lid to use for storage in the fridge, too.  Love, love, love the easy sprouter for the more difficult seeds.  

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